Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Flood Update

While just a few weeks ago just to the west of where I live it is called Alison Prairie. At the edge of the prairie stands this old barn. I bet it hasn't had water in it like this in who knows how long. Years agothis area was a prairie but now it is prime farm land. As you can see this is one of the areas that was flooded. Meems made a comment on a previous post that it was good to see corn growing in a picture I posted. I am sad to say that the field depicted was not norm for this summer for many along the rivers and creeks in our area. We were in the hilly part of our county when that picture was taken. The farmers in this part of Il which is just across the river from here are still in terrible shape even though the water has drained and evaporated.
About the only good thing about this water is that it makes for good shorebird habitat. The shorebirds that breed up north are now beginning to make their way to their wintering grounds. If you look closely in the picture below you can see a Black-necked Stilt lying down resting in the field.
The picture below is the bridge that we cross to go into Il. You can see the field in the foreground was flooded on our side of the river as well.
These people are still drying out. We pass by here every time we take Luna to Ouabache Trails Park.
The water is out of this field now. I doubt if it will dry fast enough so it can be planted, again.
You can see why we couldn't drive this road to go to the park for awhile. The water was about 4feet deep. You can see the exact line on the vegetation at the side of the road. I wish I could tell you what this smells like. Just think rotting vegetation. There are so many dead and dieing trees, bushes etc. Not to mention all the wildlife and domestic animals that were caught in the flood. I hope you all keep these farmers and citizens that lost their homes in this awful catastrophe in your prayers becasue while the flood water has dried up I am sure there are still many tears being shed.
I hope it is another 100 years before anyone has to go through this again.






22 comments:

Frances, said...

I am so sorry for this devastation. It is hard for us to see all that unwanted water while we have such a terrible drought. Sigh.

Jayne said...

Wow Lisa.... I've seen the footage on the news, but seeing your before/after views really shows the devastation. I hope too that it's another 100 years or more before your area goes through something like this again.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I realize that you are seeing the other side of this coin Frances. I am sorry for the strain it is putting on your garden. I wish I could have piped some of this water to you.

Gabriel said...

Wow! You can see it on the news and this is another view. We here in Puerto Rico "huracanes" or storms create floods every where because our topography and bad plans on construction. We know how these people feel. I hope this thing never happen again. Be strong, if you can read this, you are alive! What's the more important thing?

Dee/reddirtramblings said...

Lisa, I am truly sorry about all of the flooding. I thought the barn was some sort of dock at first. Hopefully, it will be another 100 years.~~Dee

Rose said...

Lisa, I think our local news focused more on the flooding in Iowa and along the Mississippi, but this is just as horrible. My heart goes out to these people; I doubt the farmers will have any kind of crop this year.

Joyce said...

I kept wondering why the news never showed this part of Illinois-they must not have had reporters stationed there at all. It' a little frustrating that the story has pretty much been dropped, when they still haven't even got all the bridges open over the Mississppi, and people still have water standing in their buildings. I guess we have a short attention span. Thanks for the photos and updates.

verobirdie said...

I saw pictures in the news, but this is more "true", I mean these pictures do mean something to you and your neighbors. How sad it is, all the waste...

Cheryl said...

Dear Lisa....my heart breaks for the people who are affected by these floods....none of us can possibly realise what they are going through....I shall keep them close in my thoughts......

Gail said...

Lisa,

I've seen this driving through Illinois and it is heartbreaking. I worry that small farmers will lose everything and that we as a country will lose even more. I am not talking about the prices at the grocery store (although we will feel it there, too) ...we are losing our core identity with the loss of small farms.

I will keep them in my thoughts and in my meditation.

Gail

Meems said...

Lisa, My heart breaks for all those folks that lost their homes, farms, cars, and peace of mind in the recent floods. I will continue to pray for them. Your photos are an up close account from the area and much appreciated. I can only hope 'some good' comes out of all that excess rain water.

Teri C said...

I am always so amazed when you show these flood photos. Wow that flooding is really something.
My daughter tells me there is still a lot of water around there also (in Wisconsin).

Joyce said...

Lisa, I was just thinking that you are unfortunately going to get another big dose of water from the humongous rain we had last night. I'm sure it's barrelling down the Embarass right now.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Thank you all for your postitive thoughts and prayers. Everyone concerned appreciates this.

I talked to a friend that was affected by all this just last night. She said that her husbands personality has changed during all this. They have lost at least this years crops and she said just getting all the debris, ashphalt included, out of one field will take some time.

Don't worry Gabriel, we weren't directly affected by the floods. As I have stated some of our friends have been though.

Phillip said...

Wow, those are incredible photos. I'm like Frances - you have too much rain and we have too little. It is too bad that it can't be doled out to everyone. Such is nature!

Leedra said...

Your story seems so much more real than the news reports. Brings tears reading your story. Thanks for making us stop and look at what others are going through, while we are wanting some rain. This week we have had a little.

Annie in Austin said...

Lisa, isn't it funny that we depend on wonderful bloggers like you for intelligent, follow-up news coverage, rather than on the professional news people?

The photos of Allison Prairie are so drastic and we do wish the people well. Thanks.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

Mike - Fenphotography said...

Shocking shots Lisa, its so unimaginable what people are going through.

cindee said...

Yikes that looks terrible. Its the opposite here in CA this summer I'm affraid)-:

Marvin said...

Thanks for the update, Lisa. It's hard to imagine that much water covering what is normally dry land.

albertapostcards said...

oh my gosh, what devastation! I feel so sorry for people who have been directly affected whether their farm or personal home. Sad isn't it?

RuthieJ said...

Gosh, Lisa, I feel so bad for you guys. I think floods are the most devastating of all natural disasters. You're in my thoughts and prayers.