Sunday, January 21, 2018

January Thaw

What a delightful weekend we are having. The first warmth of the new year is upon us. The January thaw. The labyrinth is emerging. 
We had our first of the year Chipping Sparrow in our garden. Does this mean winter is over? No but when the Song Sparrow gives a few chords of it's song you know it won't be as long as it has been.
While I have been waiting for some warmer weather I came  upon this book. Lady Mayo's Garden The Diary of a Lost 19th Century Irish Garden. 
I think anyone that gardens would enjoy this book. It has everything that you would connect with gardens referenced in it. Botanical art, Victorian gardens, History, Early photography, Ireland, and as many of us are thinking garden budgets.  Her budget certainly wasn't like any I have ever even imagined but it sure is something to read about.
I was drawn to it by the botanical art. The bit I read said that it had some of Lady Mayo's and her father's sketches included. I wasn't disappointed except for the fact I would like to see more of them.  It has so much more in it and I found it fascinating. You might also. 
I haven't been paid to say anything about this book. I can't even remember how I came upon the title. 
Have you read anything good pertaining to gardens lately? Do tell.
I hope your area is getting some of this warmer weather too. But don't get too comfortable, it is only January.

36 comments:

  1. Glad the snow is thawing Lisa.
    Pretty patterns in your garden :)

    Any bird singing this time of year is a bonus.
    Our Robins sing all year. I hear a pair singing to each other as I walked the garden in the rain this morning.
    They are such happy little birds.

    The book looks and sounds interesting.
    I have just bought a book on ferns.........it is a gardeners delight>

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  2. Hi Cheryl, what is the title of your fern book? I have a fern book on my want list.

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    1. Fern fever by sarah whittingham.
      it is about the Victorian obsession with ferns.
      Rather large book with beautiful illustrations.
      Trouble is I got a touch of fern fever myself :)
      I think it may be catching.

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  3. Dear Lisa,
    here in Vienna, it too seems as if spring were coming soon. The book sounds quite interesting, I will check it out. I love reading books about gardens, especially at this time of the year. I really love Sarah Raven´s book about Sissinghurst. I had read it last year before visiting the gardens at Sissinghurst. I loved the book so much that I even reread it this winter (something I usually don´t do with books). I am also reading the Morville Hours by Katherine Swift at the moment. I also recently purchased Head Gardeners by Ambra Edwards and Secret Gardens of the Cotswolds by Victoria Summerley and not to forget Gardening at Longmeadow by Monty Don.
    Besides, thanks for leaving such a nice comment on my blog! I am happy that my brick wall post made you think about having a brick wall in your garden. Here in Vienna, brick tiles can also be purchased as they are used for indoors and outdoors. Just keep in mind that some are only suitable for indoor use as they might not be frost resistant. Who knows, maybe you will have your own brick wall soon!
    Have a great day!
    Best wishes,
    Lisa

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    1. All of the books you mentioned sound fabulous. I too love reading garden books...about gardens. I love the history and of course now days they have such great photography. I saw the book about Sissinghurst that you mentioned for sale. I will have to purchase that one. Of course when you get to actually see a garden that is written about it makes the book more important to you. Cheers.

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    2. The book about Sissinghurst is my absolute favourite. It includes many quotes by Vita Sackville-West and Sissinghurst is just such a fabulous garden. I think you would enjoy reading it. By the way, I ordered Lady Mayo´s Garden yesterday. I am looking forward to reading it!
      Best wishes,
      Lisa

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    3. I hope you enjoy the "Lady Mayo's Garden" as much as I did.
      Please let me know what you think about it.

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    4. Hi Lisa,
      I am glad to hear that you enjoy the book about Sissinghurst! I can imagine that you wish to go there. It is truly a magnificent garden! Maybe an opportunity will come up for you to visit the garden. I am so happy that I had the chance to see Sissinghurst. I also posted about Sissinghurst garden on my blog, in case you haven´t yet seen it, it might be of some interest to you now that you are reading the book. I also had the chance to visit Sarah Raven´s garden-very beautiful and inspiring too.
      I started reading Lady Mayo´s Garden and it is indeed a lovely book. I especially like the watercolours. I love to read about women who were passionate about gardening. I find it astonishing how Lady Mayo did so much of the work in her garden by herself. Like planting all those bulbs. I imagine that for a woman living at that time, creating a garden was quite extraordinary.
      Best wishes,
      Lisa

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  4. The labyrinth looks amazing. The book sounds interesting. I will look for it. This sounds similar to a book I read called "Elizabeth and her German Garden".

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    1. I have read "Elizabeth..." It isn't like "Lady Mayo's..." Totally different format. But a good read.

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  5. Warm enogh here to break a record from 1906 someone said this morning. Saw some squirrels mating but no birdsong. Love the labyrinth emerging mysteriously through the snow.

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  6. Wow. You are having an odd winter. Extremes both ways.

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  7. I like your advice: "Don't get too comfortable; it's only January." Indeed. We're having some mild weather here, too, but I'm expecting at least a few more snowstorms. I do hope we're done with the subzero stuff, though. That's exciting to have some sparrows visiting! I noticed quite a few finches today. They stay with us all winter, but they're more active and congregate in greater numbers and the winter starts to wane. Yay!

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    1. Beth, we just have to take it as it comes to us. Be sure to take advantage of these warmer days outside and the colder days inside. Cheers.

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  8. January is almost over! February is a short month and then March.....which isn't much to rave about in my neck of the woods but, it's a start!
    I've been researching how to harvest and raise butterflies. It's fascinating and doesn't seem as hard as I thought it would be.

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    1. Sally, March can be cruel here too. We usually have snow but it melts right away.
      Butterfly growing is a new hobby. I prefer to just plant plenty of plants that attract them and let nature take course.

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  9. It's a pleasure to feel that spring is over the corner, Lisa. I always feel it when I hear the swallow singing. But it's too long time to wait here...
    Love your photos, labyrinth is interesting.

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  10. I love how the labyrinth looks emerging from the snow.

    It's warmed up here too. LIke crazy warm. 60s over the weekend and 70 today.

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  11. What lovely photography ~ the first one is awesome ~

    Happy Week to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka, (A Creative Harbor)

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  12. Ah Lisa - we had a real January thaw yesterday...winter is returning tonight. Snow showers and colder temps. What a change because yesterday is was almost 60. That books looks like something I would enjoy. Must check it out. I love books! Hugs!

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  13. Lovely little bird in the tree and great photo!

    Happy Week to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  14. Your labyrinth is lovely as it emerges from the snow! I am taking some time to read a couple books by Jeff Lowenfells, Teeming with Microbes and Teeming with Nutrients. These books involve some scientific, almost classroom-like reading, but both are very interesting and should be required reading for all gardeners! They do a great job introducing the inhabitants of the soil and explain how the soil food web works, and how we gardeners can use organic practices to make it work for us to produce healthy, chemical free plants.

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  15. Hi Deb, I have read something similar but I can't think of which book. It might have been one of Doug Talamy's books. It wasn't a droll scientific book but explained the very things you mention.

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  16. Yes, I agree with the others, I do love that labyrinth of yours - its a great winter feature too. I like the face with eye band of your chipping sparrow too. That sounds an interesting garden read you have there, especially having illustrations. I'm not reading anything currently but got a few Christmas gifts that I need to take a closer look at soon but there is always much to distract me :-)

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  17. Your labyrinth provides great winter interest as well as being a joy during the summer. It seems like spring has arrived early here too although the rain and wind we've had for days are predicted to continue for the foreseeable future. Oh well, as long as it doesn't freeze again, the garden will be happy even though the clouds make it dark and grey. Your sweet feathered singer must be sharing his knowledge of an early spring for you.

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  18. Happy Weekend to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  19. We're having quite a thaw also at the moment. Above 40 degrees today.

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  20. Yes, it's still January, but the light is longer each day. I listen to birdsong in the early morning now just as the sun is rising. The chickadee's mating call, the woodpecker's drumming to attract a mate, the squawking of crows as they fly in pairs.

    Still January (I remind myself) Still cold. Still icy, but this month is nearly over. February is around the corner with sunny days ahead.

    So nice to see your labyrinth emerging from the snow. And Lady Mayo's Garden sounds intriguing. Will have to see if I can find a copy.

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  21. Thanks for 'visit' again and glad you enjoyed the fisherman statue ~

    Happy Week to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  22. We had a little spring weather here today too, but I don't want to get to excited as February and March are suppose to be the real winter days!

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    1. Now we will see what February brings to us. I hope it isn't too severe.

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  23. Thanks for visiting again and your lovely comments ~

    Happy Weekend ahead,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  24. Lisa girl hello there !
    I have been trying to get back into blogging and of course all I can think of are the plants I would love to squeeze in .. some where ? haha
    I love your labyrinth !! I don't have the space for one but I have always thought they were gorgeous .. they bring mystery to the garden and it suits yours perfectly .. can't wait to see it wake up this year ... sweet little sparrow !
    We have Bluejays that sweep in for a few peanuts now and again.
    That flash of blue is so pretty.
    Our weather is still deep winter .. you know us , we always lag behind in that department.
    Thanks for stopping by girl : )

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  25. Thanks for visiting again and your great comments ~

    Happy Weekend to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  26. About that January thaw....
    I was out and doing a little pruning, but it's been cold since which is about what we expect for the end of the month. to tell you the truth I prefer a solid cold since it seems to help cool off my spring fever and not get me too antsy!
    The book sounds really interesting, I just read another online review and it made me sad thinking about the whole garden being lost. I prefer to think they become secret gardens waiting for the next person to come along and breath life back in...

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  27. Your Labyrinth looks lovely peeking out from under the melting snow and I love the picture of the Chipping Sparrow...both signs of spring to come. Winter is a good time for some garden reading and the book you described sounds lovely. Keep thinking spring and have a great week!

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