Friday, November 30, 2018

Red-winged Blackbird Nest in Teasel

           This year we have done a phenology  study for CISMA on some invasive plant species in our county. I have driven by and stopped to look at this clump of Teasel at least once per month. This small clump is one of several plants  that make up a whole colony of Teasel along this fence line. 
The extraordinary thing about this clump is that a Red-winged Blackbird had it's nest in this plant and I didn't notice it one time during summer. Yet when we stopped to see this colony of teasel this month after all has been frozen I could see this neat structure of a home. 
Red-winged Blackbird is a ubiquitous summer nester in these parts. Most people ignore them either because they are so prevalent or they don't sport the more colorful features of other birds. I have always loved them since you can count on them being the harbingers of spring as the males swoop in from their Southern wintering areas to claim their territories in February.  Sitting along the fence lines throwing their red epaultes singing that song that the females are attracted to.  Then soon after the females clothed in their best camouflage move in . They work hard to knit these nests and raise their young.
With all that I don't have a good picture of a Red-wing. They are very leery of humans. Who can blame them? If you don't know this handsome blackbird you can go here to see them.
I can't help but think of spring this morning as our area is blanketed with fog and the Carolina Wrens are singing. I hope you all have a great weekend. 

22 comments:

  1. What a sweet find. Nature always finds a way.

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  2. It is amazing to see a nest constructed down in there. I love those birds, especially in a row on a fence or a cornfield.

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  3. A reminder that spring is just around the corner sounds like just the ticket to start your weekend out on the right note. Enjoy it, Lisa!

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  4. Fascinating post about the red-winged feathered friend and the teasel ~ Neat photos too!

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  5. This isn't a bird we have in the UK so I visited the link and they are really beautiful. Many birds seem to enjoy teasel seeds. We once planed some on the allotment but they became a nuisance so we removed them.

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  6. wonderful...you could see bird's nest in nature.

    have a great day

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  7. Beautiful nest Lisa, work of art.

    As you know teasels are a native here.
    I have always liked them and even allow them in the garden.
    I am ruthless though about how many stay as they can spread.
    BUT they are an absolute joy for anyone who like birds, bees and butterflies.

    Chilly wet and windy today.
    We will be going to the Christmas Fayre in the village shortly.
    Despite the weather supporting our local people is important to us.

    Have a lovely day Lisa.

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  8. Hi Lisa, I finally made it to your blog. Love this post. I followed the links. Your district sounds very progressive. We have blackbirds, although they are not native, they were brought by the British when they settled here. I love them but there is no red - just shiny black with yellow beak. That's the males, anyway. What a thrill to find that nest.

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  9. I had specially a look in wiki about teasels, they're very pretty birds, Lisa.
    Happy December!

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  10. Nature is amazing and it’s always fun to find an unexpected surprise. I don’t think I have ever seen a Red-winged Blackbird nest. Thank you for sharing this!

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  11. I absolutely agree with you about red-winged blackbirds. I get so excited when I hear the first ones in the spring. About late March in my area (Montreal, Canada). Robins too when I hear their cheerful calls a bit earlier than the red-wings.

    What a find to see that work of art in your teasels! It seems birds find the strangest places to build their nests. Although not really strange, but rather close to the ground, I would think.

    Snowy here - rather early this year, and gardening long gone, which is why I love to visit gardening blogs and see what's growing in other's gardens.

    Have a good week!

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  12. I love the red-winged blackbirds I see here. I don't know if they nest here or not, but I'm guessing they do because I see them throughout the year.

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  13. Lisa - I as well love those red-winged blackbirds. I know when I see them and hear their special song spring has arrived. Are not bird's nests the most amazing works of art? Hope your Dec. is off to a great start. Hugs!

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  14. We see RW Blackbirds in our back garden pretty often during summer. They also nest in the hedge along the west side of the Lurie Garden. Sometimes they dive bomb people who get too close. I actually think they are an attractive bird with the red markings.

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  15. That truly is a neat home, it amazes me how they can make such a home like that!

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  16. Great to 'see you' ~ love your visits and comments ~ Hope the pre-holiday times are delighting you ~ ^_^

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  17. What a nifty find! It's so interesting what is revealed when the thick foliage and growth of summer fades away--we get to see the wildlife hiding places! The RW blackbirds take over the waterfront during spring through Mulberry time up at the cottage. They squawk at us when we come near--they aren't terribly shy. I'll have to try to get some photos next summer. ;-)

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  18. Dropping in to say thank you for your comments on my haiku and to wish you a happy and gentle weekend ~ ^_^

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  19. I thought you have a new post.
    have a great weekend

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  20. Red-wing blackbirds may be common, but I have rarely seen them around here. I did see one a few years ago and was taken by its striking appearance. It is hard to believe one could ignore them!

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  21. Always wonderful to have you visit ~ thanks for the comments on my critter photo ~ ^_^

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  22. Hello Lisa girl !
    I love that you spotted this nest : ) .. everything is so camouflaged until winter pulls back the curtain. I think of the same thing when I see these birds .. that Spring is coming .. it will be along time coming here (as usual for Canucks, haha) .. but yes, when you first spot them you know it can't be too long.
    If I don't swing by before Xmas .. I hope you and your family have wonderful holidays ! Take care
    Joy

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